4 Tips for Moving with Horses

Moving can be difficult—moving with horses is even more difficult.
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Whether you're planning to move across the state or across the country, being prepared for your move will help lower anxiety for both you and your horse. Be prepared with these tips for moving with horses.

Tip 1: Find a Veterinarian

Your horses' health is the number-one concern, so try to find a veterinarian at your new location before your move and send your horses' information to the clinic. Having a veterinarian contact before moving ensures the clinic is familiar with your horses' medical histories in case an emergency arises. The American Association of Equine Practitioners is a source to find a qualified veterinarian in your area.

Female vet giving an injection to a brown horse

Tip 2: Find a Farrier

Your horses' hooves will likely need trimming or shoes reset within the first month or two after you move. Being new to the area, you need to find a farrier right away to get on a schedule before your horses are due for work. That's because most farriers have full schedules and pencil in clients weeks in advance. As a new client, you'll want to get acquainted with your new farrier so he or she understands your horses' needs. The American Farrier’s Association is a source to find certified farrier in your area.

Farrier holding horse hoof with horse shoe on and nail hammer.

Tip 3: Pack an Emergency Kit

An emergency kit belongs in your trailer always, but especially on long trips to deal with any issues that may arise. My own emergency-kit must-haves include vet wrap, triple antibiotic ointment, cotton wrap, scissors, and duct tape. Be sure to pack your emergency kit in an easy-to-access spot in your trailer.

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Tip 4: Keep Things Stress Free

Traveling is stressful for any horse. To help lower stress levels upon arrival, try to make your horses' new home feel as similar to their previous living conditions as possible. This may be a harder task if it means your horses will be transitioning from living on your property to living at a boarding facility. Bear in mind that even small things that can be kept the same will make a difference in how your horses adjust to their new home. 

Grey horse laying down in a field of grass.

MORE ON TRAVELING WITH HORSES:

Road-Ready Tips

Trailering Tips

Best First-Aid Kit

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