Barn Utility Vehicles - Horse&Rider

Barn Utility Vehicles

The right motorized cart can make life around the barn a lot easier. Here are three to consider.
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Customization
Model: XRT1550.
Maker: Club Car.
Why buy: It’s versatile. Choose from gas or diesel engines, two- or four-passenger models, and a variety of implements that easily swap out.
Cool feature: The vehicle senses the terrain and automatically switches to four-wheel drive when necessary—no buttons or levers.
More info: Visit clubcardealer.com/locator.
Price: Starting at $10,900.

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Cargo Space
Model: XUV 825i S4.
Maker: John Deere.
Why buy: It offers a top speed of 44 mph, four-wheel drive, and up to 11 inches of ground clearance.
Cool feature: The rear seat cargo space can hold two extra passengers with under-seat storage or fold down for more cargo space.
More info: Visit johndeere.com.
Price: $14,199

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Power
Model: RTV X-Series.
Maker: Kubota.
Why buy: A powerful 21.6-horsepower diesel engine, standard four-wheel drive, and hydraulic power steering provide comfort and control.
Cool feature: The steel-structured frame insulates the operator from outside noise and vibrations.
More info: Visit kubota.com.
Price: $13,345

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Buyer Savvy
In the market for a new utility vehicle? Consider these six factors before you buy.

What are you hauling? If you’ll mostly use the vehicle to cart people from one spot to another on your property or at a horse show, look for a comfort-based model with a smooth ride and protection from the machine’s noise and vibration. If you’re more likely to haul a few bales of hay or fencing supplies, small luxuries aren’t as necessary; cargo space is what you’re looking for. Some models do offer convertible space that can go from passenger to cargo mode.

Do you need attachments? Many vehicles tout quick-change attachment systems. If you’ll take advantage of these accessories, ease of attachment and detachment can be important to save you time and effort.

What’s your terrain? A hilly or mountainous property probably requires four-wheel drive. Same if you’ll drive in mud or snow on a regular basis. Flat, dry terrain might mean you can get by without the extra wheel power.

Are you able to perform maintenance and repairs? If you’re a mechanical type, or have one of those in your life, it’s not as important to buy local or purchase extra warranty coverage. You should consider those options if you don’t have time or skills to perform necessary upkeep on your vehicle.

Do your horse friends have utility vehicles they can recommend? In your search, be sure to ask horse owners in your area what type of vehicle they prefer or if there’s a dealership they’d recommend. Local horse folks deal with the same conditions you’ll face in your utility vehicle, so learn from their experiences.

Do your memberships provide a discount? Many breed and discipline associations, roadside-assistance programs, and other organizations you might belong to offer members discounts on items like utility vehicles.

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